Ramblings on Spodumene, Triphane, Petalite and Egos…

In 1800, “spodumene” was discovered by José Bonifácio de Andrada e Silva (aka d’Andrada), a Brazilian statesman, naturalist, professor and poet. He was the one who coined the name “spodumene.” BTW, the mineral andradite is also named after d’Andrada. Spodumene comes from the Greek word “spodoumenos” which means “burnt to ash” referring to its ashy

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Brown Spots on Amethyst Clusters

Brownish spots on amethyst (especially visible on clusters) are nothing unusual and are perfectly normal. They have nothing to do with “negative energies.” They are iron oxide spots. The brownish spots are iron that started growing on the amethyst as the amethyst was forming. The iron simply mixed in with the primary composition of amethyst

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Brochantite

This pretty green specimen is brochantite, a copper sulfate mineral with a chemical composition of Cu4SO4(OH)6. Brochantite is named after French geologist and mineralogist A.J.M. Brochant de Villiers. Brochantite forms in arid climates or in copper sulfide areas where quick oxidation takes place. Like other copper based minerals (malachite malachite, azurite, chrysocolla to name a

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